Block Breaker #3

Block breakers are short stories, random ditties for which the only real purpose is to write something, anything when Writer’s Block strikes. Quality, verbosity, fidelity, consistency – none of these words apply. Just write or die.

So I’m procrastinating from prepping for writing, by writing… here we go again!

P.s. days later, and this has turned into quite a monster, highlighted this in  the Ah the Corners post, it grew and grew, pulled in research, had a few bumpy changes of directions. It’s still not edited, nor even spell checked – exactly as a Block Breaker should be, but it’s 8,500 words, about ten times longer than it should be. Going to be another post, just exploring this monster. However I put it out there for those with the patient, and ability to read drivel.


Ascendant’s Fire

“Brother!” Kaalem screamed, spotting her enemy across the battlefield, she charged forwards sword gleaming in the light of fire and destruction around her as it trailed behind poised to strike.

Rylan turned to face the scream, he pulled his battleaxe from it’s recent victim, and as he moved into a  ready stance he drew the battleaxe up ready to strike, his gaze looked on the threat charging across the battlefield.

The siblings meters away from clashing, were suddenly seperated by a wall of fire that swept across the carnage between them, blocking the way.

Kaalem screamed as she drew up short before the flames, just then an enemy soldier charged at her, lunging with a lance, she rolled to the left away from the flames, and as she found her feet, the sword struck out biting into the out stretched arm, causing it to recoil in pain. The soldier was hardy though, he switched the lance to his arm, and wielded it one handed. Kaalem feigned a roll to the right, and as the lance struck true to where she should have been, she plunged her blade into his eye, his body went limp, and as she withdrew the blade the body slumped to the ground twitching.

A ghostly figure drew up beside the warrior.

“You did it,” she accused him, as she cleaned the blade.

“It was not time, you’re not ready,” the figure said calmly.

Continue reading

Daily Flash Fiction Challenge 57: To Bend a King’s will

This is the 57th a series of 365 Flash Fiction stories I’m writing. You can find out more about the challenge here.

To Bend a King’s Will, by Jonathan L. Lawrence, 27th January 2012

Word count: 752

“I am a corruption, an anomaly. I have stood upon this land for a millenia before this castle was first built, and the first castle was built a very long time ago,” the young man in worn robes said, sombrely.

“I tire of these theatrics, wizard,” the aged, “Citing your supposed age does not convince me that I should give this barbarian such a dangerous weapon. It would be madness, it makes any that holder blood mad. Barbarians are already blood mad. That’s why we lock them up.”

“This is not a barbarian, but it is true he is a beserker. The weapon was made for true beserkers, only they can control the blood rage,” the wizard said becoming animated, “The evil that approaches can not be faced by anyone else.”

“I have despatched an army, a cadre of my finest and bravest guards, and a quartet of wizards, admittedly they’re not of your supposed stature, but they can face a demon horde well enough,” the king said.

“And they will all be dead come morning. Demons, monsters, myths, legends, all very powerful and all, but they are nothing compared with the true demon that had stirred up this horde,” the wizard said.

Continue reading

Daily Flash Fiction Challenge 54: The Killing Ghosts

This is the 54th a series of 365 Flash Fiction stories I’m writing. You can find out more about the challenge here.

The Killing Ghosts, by Jonathan L. Lawrence, 24th January 2012

Word count: 697

Theme: alien invasion, resistance, war, survival, humanity, myth, legend

The story:

I got so scared, I felt I was alone facing things that shouldn’t even exist, never mind being in a relatively unimportant city in England. Whether they should be there or not, it was irrelevant.

The day had been going so well, I had a date that night, my job was going well, everything in life was grand. A few months earlier I’d Peru much had nothing to lose, but the day they came, I lost everything important, except my life.

It was mid-September when astronomers first saw the objects in the night sky, they were a wonder, unexplainable, mysterious globes of compressed liquid. Of course we didn’t just assume they were peaceful – though we didn’t even know about brains then. When it was obvious that they were on a collision course with the Blue Planet the US military took control of all efforts in regard. to the strange phenomena. They’re best efforts didn’t even cause the globes of liquid to waver, they kept coming.

Still life went on, the world split into three types of people. First off the were your traditional end of world types, (most figured them for loons, including me at first), then there were eager and excitable scientist types, lastly there was everyone else who couldn’t conceptualise what was happening, it was just this thing in the news. Sure it was the topic of many conversations but we didn’t understand, and it was years away.

So it was quite a shock when the center of Leeds was rocked by an immense exclusion as a globe crashed right into it. I’m told this was only a small one, but I was within five miles of impact it never felt small. It was the advanced unit, there to probe and test how we’d react, the rest of their armada arrived a month later, with sporadic advanced drops in medium cities around the world in between.

Continue reading

Daily Flash Fiction Challenge 44: Nothing gained

This is the 44th in a series of 365 Flash Fiction stories I’m writing. You can find out more about the challenge here.

The Wolf’s Time, by Jonathan L. Lawrence, 14th January 2012

Word count: 586

Theme: futility, war, loss, destruction, politics, alliances, waste

The story:

“We’ll not stand for this,” those were the words my king uttered that launched us into a decade of warfare.

King Correstus was right to oppose the kingdom of Sowii’s threats, blackmail really, of annexing our Eastern holdings if we didn’t support them in a war against our ally the kingdom of Eglasia, not a single man of the court would disagree.

So the land of Casii readied itself for war. The army was enlarged in a wholesale recruitment drive, the nation’s blacksmiths went into overdrive to provide the arms we would require, (though as any soldier will tell you, the quality left a lot to be desired at times), farmers and laborers doubled their efforts to prepare to feed a significant portion of the population that would no longer be working towards the goal of providing sustenance or resources. Our less powerful allies were pressed for support in a variety of ways, and of course we contacted King Veron of Eglasia.

Two months later in a coordinated move the armies of Casii attacked the Eastern border of Sowii, while the armies of Eglasia attacked the Northern border.

It should have been enough to force the Sowii to surrender, but they had prepared for war too, and they had large companies of mercenaries to swell their numbers.

Continue reading

Daily Flash Fiction Challenge 34: Dystopian Dreams of the Absent Minded Author

This is the 34th in a series of 365 Flash Fiction stories I’m writing. You can find out more about the challenge here.

Dystopian Dreams of the Absent Minded Author, by Jonathan L. Lawrence, 3rd January 2012

Word count: 793

Theme: war, hopelessness, future, dystopia, desire, dreams

The story:

Humanity, the tiny blot on an otherwise pristine lifeless landscape of the universe, was growing ever larger. Though no destiny could ever bring a race such as humanity to rival in significance the awesome size of the universe, they were becoming noticeable.

Earth had quickly become a hard place to survive, once the planet went over the Green Cliff seas rising, depletion of fresh water wild food stocks started to be affected by the masses of extinctions. Land vanished, crops withered, disease ran rampant. Mankind had no choice but to look to the stars for salvation.

In the century following, a billion people left Earth, over a quarter of the world’s population abandoned the planet for better lives among the stars.

Continue reading